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Showing content with the highest reputation since 05/23/2017 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    My advice is use a combination lock only. Never give access to your lock to anyone, not even TSA. The best way to do this is a combination that only you know and if TSA asks to get in your case then YOU open it. A key is too often lost and even TSA agents will try to get you to hand them your key. If there is no key then this doesn't happen. My other piece of advice is to use those lock boxes that come with a cable. That way you can loop the cable through the rails on the inside of your luggage so the gun is secured to the suitcase and can't be removed without unlocking it.
  2. 2 points
    When you travel it can be one of the most vulnerable times for you and your family. You will be in a strange place and probably will not know your surroundings well. These can lead to you ending up in "bad neighborhoods" where crime could be rampant, or your chances for victimization will greatly increase. I've recently had the pleasure of traveling with a firearm and so far every time the process has been pretty easy and straight forward. I've only traveled with Southwest Airlines but the process should be similar for other carriers. Knowing What Is Required To Fly With a Firearm To help streamline the process and limit the chances you get caught up in some lengthy squabble with the TSA or gate agents you need to know what is required to fly with a firearm. The biggest thing is to make sure you give yourself enough time at the ticketing counter and to go through security (AKA: Don't arrive 15 minutes before your flight). When you fly with a firearm it must go inside your checked baggage in a hard-sided locked container, and it must be unloaded. Ammo must be stored separately from the firearm, and in an approved container. The Best Way To Fly With A Gun As we mentioned above a hard sided container that can lock is a requirement for flying with a firearm. Most of the time any quality gun purchase will include a hard-sided container that you can easily lock. But if you want to fly with a little extra protection and security Pelican makes an awesome Hard-sided Gun Case, that is TSA approved. The firearm must be completely unloaded, that means not a round in the chamber or a loaded magazine in the firearm. Though the guidelines suggest that having a loaded magazine inside the locked case is okay, it just can not be inside the firearm. I suggest not having ammo inside the locked case at all just to be on the safe side, and avoid dealing with the "wonderful" people of the TSA. The next thing you will need is a lock to secure the case. You can use just about any standard lock, either combination or key. Just make sure you have the key with you at all times, or the combination ready. The TSA can ask you to open the case at anytime so make sure you aren't fumbling around trying to appease them. Taking Some Ammo With You If you're taking a firearm chances are good you'll need some ammo with you. Ammunition must also travel inside checked baggage, and it must be stored inside fiber, wood, or metal boxes or other packaging designed to carry small amounts of ammo. Protip: Just keep the original manufacturers packaging when flying with ammo. It will make your life a lot easier Time To Declare Your Firearm TSA regulations require you to notify the ticketing agent that you have a firearm locked securely inside your baggage. Each airport/airline will probably be a little different but flying out of Detroit via Southwest has always been a breeze, has have the return flights from Sky Harbor out in Phoenix. When you approaching the counter you simply say "I need to declare a firearm". The ticketing agent will most likely provide a card for you to fill out with your name and information. On the reverse will be a little disclaimer about it being unloaded and etc. That's all there is to flying with a firearm within the TSA guidelines. Most of the time its going to be a easy and smooth process, just ensure the firearm is unloaded and locked, and that ammo is stored in a container properly.
  3. 1 point
    I was out for a car trip enjoying the nice weather today and stopped by a gun store down in Defiance Ohio called Hammers Tactical. I saw an ad online the night before and they had a Mossberg 590 Shockwave for sale in the store. After a quick email to ensure it was okay for Ohio residents to buy them after the hoopla that's been following them online I figured I'd give it a shot. Long story short, walked right in, paid, of course, did the paperwork and walked right back out with it. No ATF agents or anything was awaiting me upon leaving so I figured that was a good sign. Just got back with it and can't wait to take it out to shoot this weekend. Looks like a lot of fun for sure.
  4. 1 point
    The only real ambiguity is that Ohio doesn't define the term "shotgun". It simply says a shotgun with a barrel less than 18" or with an overall length of less than 26" is a dangerous ordnance. Since they don't define "shotgun", the issue is whether or not this is a shotgun. Under federal law, the definition of shotgun specifically states that a shotgun is a gun that was designed to be shouldered. Since this was never designed from the manufacturer to have a shoulder stock, the feds have said it is not a shotgun. But since Ohio doesn't have such a definition, the ambiguity is whether Ohio courts will follow the federal definition or use one of their own. I personally think using a different definition is problematic for a number of reasons, but who knows what courts will do.
  5. 1 point
    When you travel it can be one of the most vulnerable times for you and your family. You will be in a strange place and probably will not know your surroundings well. These can lead to you ending up in "bad neighborhoods" where crime could be rampant, or your chances for victimization will greatly increase. I've recently had the pleasure of traveling with a firearm and so far every time the process has been pretty easy and straight forward. I've only traveled with Southwest Airlines but the process should be similar for other carriers. View full article
  6. 1 point
    Haven't seen anything official from other Prosecutors, but I have had some FFL dealers inquire about it. I come down on the side that since Ohio law doesn't define "shotgun" that we should use the definition that Federal Code uses, since that would be the commonly understood meaning in this context. As such, this should not be a "shotgun" under the Revised Code for the purposes of the definition of a "short barreled shotgun" in the dangerous ordnance definition. Be cautioned though, because I have talked informally to other prosecutors who ignore that and think a "shotgun" is a shotgun regardless of whether it is designed to be shouldered. To me, this would then mean any smooth barreled pistol designed to shoot bird shot would be a short barreled shotgun, which is absurd. But don't expect the ATF to beat down your door because they've already approved it. What you have to worry about is local prosecutors applying (or misapplying) Ohio law to charge you with a state crime of possessing an unregistered dangerous ordnance. I THINK you'll be fine, but like I said, I haven't seen anything official from Ohio yet. Anyway, enjoy it. I'm sure it will be fun to shoot and make a good home defense gun. I like having the stock on my defense shotgun, but wouldn't hesitate for one minute to grab one of these.
  7. 1 point
    I have found the solution to my britches dropping all the way down to the "HOOD" level is "SUSPENDERS" They work everytime!
  8. 1 point
    But....but....those braided belts my mom made me wear to church when I was 12 are just so awesome!!
  9. 1 point
    Short answer is Yes. R.C. 2923.126(A) says in part: "...If a licensee is the driver or an occupant of a motor vehicle that is stopped as the result of a traffic stop or a stop for another law enforcement purpose and if the licensee is transporting or has a loaded handgun in the motor vehicle at that time, the licensee shall promptly inform any law enforcement officer who approaches the vehicle while stopped that the licensee has been issued a concealed handgun license and that the licensee currently possesses or has a loaded handgun;..." Notice the duty to inform applies even if the licensee is an occupant of a motor vehicle.
  10. 1 point
    If you keep it in your house that is air conditioned it will be fine. An air conditioner cools the air in part by removing moisture from it. While I keep my ammo in a safe with a dehumidifier, I wouldn't have any problem just keeping it in the boxes in my air conditioned house. If you don't have air conditioning, or don't want to risk it, keeping it in ammo cans or another container works great. All you have to do is throw in some desiccant packs (like the little silica gel packs that come in shoe boxes) and that will remove any moisture in the container.
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